Invasive Weed Pages

Weed Inventory Map

Invasive Weed Fact Sheets

Common invasive weeds in NW New Mexico can be found below.

Click links for NMSU’s Management Do’s and Don’ts and plant information.

Bull thistle (Cirsium vulgare)

biennial, infests disturbed areas

Management and information

Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense)

perennial, infests disturbed areas

Management and information

Musk thistle (Carduus nutans)

biennial, infests disturbed areas

Management and information

Russian knapweed (Acroptilon repens)

perennial, infests disturbed areas as well as croplands, fields, rangelands, and riparian areas

Management and information

Scotch thistle (Onopordum acanthium)

biennial, infests disturbed areas as well as croplands, fields, rangelands, and riparian areas

Management and information

Leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula)

perennial, infests a wide range of soil types and habitats including roadsides, croplands, riparian areas, and pastures

Management and information

Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum)

Annual grass, infests disturbed areas as well as croplands and rangelands

Management and information

Halogeton (Halogeton glomeratus)

Annual, infests open, disturbed areas, arid areas, and alkaline soils, toxic to livestock

Management and information

Hoary cress/Whitetop (Cardaria spp.)

perennial, infests moist areas like croplands and fields, as well as disturbed areas

Management and information

For information about other invasive weeds, including Russian olive and salt cedar/tamarisk, visit NMSU’s Troublesome Weeds of New Mexico home page.

Russian Olive & Salt Cedar Control

Russian olive and tamarisk (salt cedar) are aggressive, invasive trees that infest river banks, use excessive water, compete with native species, and form dense stands prone to wildfire. Removal and management of these trees is essential to maintaining the health of the rivers and land in our district.

San Juan SWCD projects have cleared over 7,000 acres of Russian olive and salt cedar in the past ten years, and have chemically treated even more acres of resprouts. Through funding from NM State Forestry, US Forest Service, the State of New Mexico, and San Juan County, our projects have removed hazardous fuels for 110 private landowners, and have cleared firebreaks and improved river access for Farmington, Aztec, Bloomfield, San Juan County, Jackson Lake Wildlife Management Area, Navajo Lake State Park, Bureau of Land Management, US Fish and Wildlife, Bureau of Reclamation, and the Navajo Nation.

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